Army Training Program2018-01-24T13:58:21+00:00

U.S. Army rangers parachute from an Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during a mass tactical jump over Fryar Drop Zone at Fort Benning, Ga., on Aug. 3, 2009.  The jump is the opening exercise of Ranger Rendezvous 2009, a week-long event that provides an opportunity for members of the 75th Ranger Regiment to showcase their tactics and abilities to family members and ranger veterans.  DoD photo by Senior Airman Jason Epley, U.S. Air Force.  (Released)
While participating in Army ROTC, cadets have a multitude of options when it comes to those seeking additional training. Some of these opportunities include:

AIRBORNE SCHOOL

Becoming a paratrooper at Airborne School is a unique experience requiring special dedication and a desire to be challenged mentally and physically. This three-week course, also known as Basic Airborne Course, teaches Soldiers the techniques involved in parachuting from airplanes and landing safely. The final test includes a non-assisted jump.

The purpose of the BAC is to qualify the volunteer in the use of the parachute as a means of combat deployment and to develop leadership, self-confidence, and an aggressive spirit through mental and physical conditioning.

Airborne Soldiers have a long and distinguished tradition of being an elite body of fighting men and women–people who have always set the example for determination and courage. When you volunteer for this training, you accept the challenge of continuing this tradition. The Airborne Soldiers of the past set high standards–it is now up to you to maintain them!

 

AIR ASSAULT SCHOOL

US Army Air Assault School is a two-week (10 days) course of instruction conducted at several locations across the Army, including Fort Campbell, Kentucky; Fort Drum, NY; Camp Smith, USMA; and at overseas locations in Germany and Hawaii. In each case, the course of instruction is focused on Combat Assault Operations involving US Army rotary-wing aircraft. Our battalion usually receives only one or two slots to Air Assault School(s) each summer, which are open to both male and female cadets meeting the minimum requirements listed below.

 

NORTHERN WARFARE TRAINING

Arctic, subarctic, and mountain environments are brutally unforgiving to the unprepared. Units that have successfully fought in these environments have historically been those with special individual skills, are physically and mentally tough, and have extensive experience and expertise operating in harsh conditions.

Students are taught basic mountain climbing and mountaineering skills including rock climbing, mountain walking techniques, basic knots, ice climbing, and route selection. . Mountain phase includes climbing, rappelling, and medical evacuation. The River phase covers boat operations, stream crossing, and river charting, reading and navigation. The Glacier phase covers crevasse rescue, step cutting and anchors, and belaying and party climbing. The course culminates in a three day field exercise that takes place on Gulkana Glacier, Alaska. This training opportunity is an excellent way to see and experience the spender of Alaska. All costs for travel, meals and lodging are covered by ROTC. The schedule for this training is during the summer.

 

MOUNTAIN WARFARE TRAINING

Mountain Warfare School is designed to develop and conduct training for the Department of the Army in basic and advanced mountain warfare and cold weather skills and tactics to be employed by combat units during all climatic conditions.

This training is conducted at the Ethan Allen Firing Range in Jericho, Vermont.

 

CADET TROOP LEADER TRAINING

The Cadet Troop Leader Training (CTLT) provides Cadets the opportunity to experience leadership in Army units over a three to four week period. Cadets serve in LT level leadership positions in active duty units. Platoon Leader positions have a 3-4 week duration depending on the hosting unit and location. Assignments include units that are located CONUS and OCONUS. Cadets are assigned a unit mentor, and are provided on-post lodging and meals via a Dining Facility. This program is exclusively designed for MSIII Cadets. This program is exclusively designed for MSIII Cadets before and after completion of LDAC.

 

CULP PROGRAM

For Army ROTC Cadets, the world is their classroom. Every year hundreds of Cadets travel the globe via the Cultural Understanding and Language Proficiency (CULP) Program, spending up to three weeks immersed in foreign cultures, learning more about how other others around the world view the U.S. and, in the process, learning more about themselves.

The Army recognizes the need for young leaders to develop more cultural awareness and foreign language proficiency skills. Now more than ever, cultural awareness training is a vital component to the ROTC curriculum. Overseas immersions help educate future leaders in ways the classroom cannot.

Cadets now receive opportunity to compete for immersion in more than 40 countries. These opportunities expose them to everyday life in different cultures and intensifies language study, which helps produce commissioned officers who possess the right blend of language and cultural skills required to support global operations in the 21st Century.

Participants experience up to three different venues during immersion, including humanitarian service, host nation military-to-military contact and education on the social, cultural and historical aspects of the country. In 2012, 1,200 ROTC Cadets traveled across the world and participated in Cadet Command’s CULP program. The future goal is for at least half of all Cadets to complete a CULP Immersion Internship annually.